Weeping Conifers Should Make You Smile

We had about 4″ of fluffy snow float down this morning followed by some freezing rain.  I had a presentation in Blue Mounds, WI tonight that had been rescheduled due to potentially bad road conditions.  We’re behind on snowfall this winter so I’m not opposed to more moisture ultimately for the spring garden.  Of course, driving in this weather isn’t very exciting but at least we aren’t in Buffalo or Boston!  This blog focuses on the merit and value of weeping conifers out in the garden.  Their color and form are certainly welcome in the winter garden as seen with the weeping Norway spruce (Picea abies ‘Pendula’) seen above or the weeping white pine (Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’) seen directly below.  Keep in mind that deciduous conifers like larch (Larix), bald cypress (Taxodium sp.), dawn redwood (Metasequoia sp.), etc. offer wonderful form in the growing season but lack the foliage impact in winter as their needles have been shed.  They can still offer form but not as pronounced as the evergreens seen in this blog (just a smattering of what is available!).  Weeping conifers can be focal points out in the garden 365 days per year and their variability in form and size make them adaptable to a wide range of settings and garden situations.  Here are just a couple ideas.

It was relatively slow at the Horticulture Center today with the weather being a factor for travel.  Larry, Bill and Dave all went to some training for maintenance on our lawn mowers and Jenny M. was in for more painting.  We also saw Maury, Mary Kay and Dr. Yahr.  I finished some work regarding our Spring Plant Sale seeds (ready for the growers!) and plenty of other tasks. 

weeping white pine (Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’)
 weeping pine (Pinus sp.) – thought it was a white pine but not sure (here at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden) – might be a weeping Japanese red pine
 weeping Norway spruce (Picea abies ‘Pendula’) at Chanticleer
 contorted silver fir (Abies alba ‘Green Spiral’)
 weeping Alaskan cedar (Cupressus nootkatensis ‘Pendula’) – Anderson Japanese Garden
 weeping temple juniper (Juniperus rigida ‘Pendula’) – Chicago Botanic Garden
 weeping Norway spruce (Picea abies ‘Weeping Blue’)
weeping white pine (Pinus strobus ‘Pendula’)
 weeping Rocky mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum ‘Tolleson’s Weeping’)
 weeping Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens glauca ‘Pendula’)
 weeping Jack pine (Pinus banksiana ‘Uncle Fogy’)
 weeping Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens ‘The Blues’) – Bickelhaupt Arboretum (Clinton, IA)
weeping Canadian hemlock (Tsuga canadensis ‘Sargentii’)

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